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 Wah-Wah Oboe

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Age : 64
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PostSubject: Wah-Wah Oboe    Fri Sep 28, 2018 7:22 pm

In my recent flurry of buying baritone saxophone albums — Pepper Adams, Gerry Mulligan, Serge Chaloff, Cecil Payne, Nick Brignola et al — I ran across a Mulligan track (one only) where he plays clarinet.

Now there have been several jazz clarinetists, like Benny Goodman, Pete Fountain, Sidney Bechet, Artie Shaw, Jimmy Dorsey, Jimmy Giuffre, Woody Herman and many others.  I believe the fingering is similar(?) to the sax so if you can play one you can play the other fairly easily.

But what about double reed instruments, oboes and bassoons?  I could only think of one jazz reed player who occasionally played oboe, Eric Dolphy.  Paul Winter’s Consort (and later Oregon) included oboist Paul McCandless, but he didn’t really play in a jazz idiom.  He was one reason those groups bridged jazz and classical — he played classically.

Well, Karl Jenkins played occasional oboe in Soft Machine.  He was sorta jazzy.  Bob Cooper and Yusef Lateef played occasional oboe.  Roscoe Mitchell too.

And the RIO jazz-rock groups like Univers Zero, Present, Aranis, Henry Cow, Art Zoyd usually employed a bassoonist (always one of the same three: Michel Berckmans, Dirk Descheemaeker or Lindsay Cooper).

But IN GENERAL, seeing how many saxophonists also played flute or clarinet, or other sizes soprano/alto/tenor/baritone/bass sax, it struck me that jazz oboe and jazz bassoon are almost unheard of.  So I went looking.

I read several articles online that said the double reed instruments are really hard to “swing.”  Dunno why exactly, but everyone agrees.

Found two jazz bassoonists, both fairly young, both fairly unknown.  Michael Rabinowitz is a New Yorker (by way of CT) who has “introduced the bassoon to jazz.”  His 1995 release “Bassoon on Fire” is described in the liner notes as the first-ever jazz bassoon album.  On one track his plays through a wah-wah creating a very unbassoonlike sound.

The other is Californian Paul Hanson, who includes electronic effects and electric guitar so his “Voodoo Suite” (2000) isn’t really straight jazz.  But it’s very, very interesting.

I still think it’s odd these instruments are so rare in jazz.
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PostSubject: Re: Wah-Wah Oboe    Fri Sep 28, 2018 7:57 pm

Correction: Dolphy played bass clarinet. Not oboe.
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